Q&A with Wendy, our women’s health physio

Q. Post-pregnancy I leak when coughing or when trying to run despite having worked on my pelvic floor – why is that?

A. In the case that your pelvic floor muscle is weak and requires strengthening, there is a level of skill required to train it properly. It is a fan shaped muscle and for it to work optimally, we need to contract it according to the direction in which the muscle fibres lie.

Written by Wendy Casterton, Physiotherapist

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What is going on and what can be done to improve things?

Women’s health-related issues are manifold and can be complex in nature. As such, it is often difficult to get a clear diagnosis and explanation as to what is going on and what can be done to improve things. This can lead to a serious level of compromise in our quality of life, affecting us in our personal relationships as well as socially and professionally. Nevertheless, physiotherapy centred around the very specific anatomy of a women’s pelvis and abdomen can help to address these problems, helping to restore confidence in your body and achieve your life goals.

Written by Wendy Casterton, Physiotherapist

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How do physiotherapist get back to fitness after pregnancy

” I suffered from a large rectus diastisis (abdominal separation) after having my twins and have worked hard on core strengthening Pilates Exercises. If done correctly with good positioning these are very effective in strengthening the abdominal core muscles again.”

SARAH HAYWARD, Senior Physiotherapist, Prohealth In Touch Physiotherapy

 

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Q&A with Women’s Health Physio: Back pain early in pregnancy

Q: I’m pregnant and my back is starting to hurt. I’ve been told I need to just get on with this, as it’s just “pregnancy aches and pains”. Is there anything I can do?
Suzy: Yes, absolutely. While not uncommon, back pain early in pregnancy is not deemed normal and should be addressed. It often coincides with a muscular imbalance around the pelvis and can happen alongside other common areas of pain such as the hips, buttocks and pubic area. With the amount of change that happens in the body during pregnancy, it is hardly surprising that sometimes our muscles are slow to catch up! It is also important to note that women who experience back pain in pregnancy are up to 7 times more likely to experience some form of pelvic floor dysfunction, as the muscles can begin to function differently in response. Here at InTouch Physio, we can help you to address these issues, identify the structures which need work and try to reduce your symptoms so that you can enjoy your pregnancy

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Are pelvic floor muscles functioning correctly? Over 25% of women suffered from Pelvic Floor Dysfunction (PSD)

Over 25% of all women are believed to suffer from pelvic floor dysfunction (PFD), and this number is generally considered to be an underestimation due to the sensitive nature of the symptoms; meaning that many cases go unreported.

The pelvic floor muscles are a crucial part of our musculoskeletal system, providing support for our internal organs, support for our unborn baby when pregnant, controlling continence and playing an important part in the sexual function.

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Lucie’s Tips: Safe exercises for pregnant women

Safe exercises for pregnant women1. Sitting Glut Stretch

Key benefits: It’s a great stretch to loosen up the hips and lower back.
1. Sit on a chair and cross one leg over the other.
2. Keep your back straight and lean forward at the hips.
3. Try to hold for 30 seconds and repeat on the other side.
4. This can be done as often as you would like.
This might prove more difficult later on when the bump gets bigger and in the way.

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