How much resistance training needs to be included in a training program to be effective?

A recent systematic review asked this question. The authors concluded that there is a clear dose-response effect regarding strength training and its injury prevention effect. This means that the greater the volume and intensity of strength training undertaken the greater the injury preventative effects were experienced. This was observed for both acute and overuse injuries across all types of sports (Lauersen et al 2018).

Written by Michael Bushell, Physiotherapist

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You can’t go wrong by being strong!

You may be a talented rugby player, a novice marathon runner, a coach to a high school badminton player, an elderly fitness enthusiast or a weekend warrior playing park football. Whatever example matches yours, statistically you’ve either been injured yourself or have had to coach an individual through an injury. Some of us may be incredibly skilled at our sport or dedicated to our fitness regimes but are constantly injured and therefore never get the chance to fulfill our sporting and fitness goals. Although injuries are never completely unavoidable there are clear, evidenced-based ways to reduce the risk.

Written by Michael Bushell, Physiotherapist

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Q&A with our triathlete physio Wendy Casterton

What made you become a physio?

It was always my dream job! My first undergraduate degree was in French, yet with life experience and a personal training and sports massage qualification, I was accepted on to a physiotherapy degree as a mature student. Nothing gives me greater pleasure than to see my clients smile again once they know they’re recovering from or in control of their physical ailment. As a physio, compared with other medical professionals, we have the privilege of spending a little more time with clients to really get to know them, which really helps with aligning treatment with their goals.

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Triathlon Injuries

Getting injured whilst participating in triathlon is incredibly common. Around 75% of all triathletes will suffer from injury during their racing career, rising to 91% for Ironman (long distance) triathletes. Overuse is the most common cause of injury – which is good news as that is something we can manage – usually occurring in the lower leg or ankle, knees, low back or shoulders. Occasionally injuries will be due to some kind of trauma, most likely falling off the bike!

Written by Wendy Casterton, Physiotherapist

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The Ageing Athlete

Ageing is unavoidable. It is happening to us all. From the year 2000 through to 2030, the number of adults over 85 years of age will increase by 204%! However, there is a simple way to slow down the effects of ageing……and it is to behave like an athlete.

Currently most people older than 75 years of age have 3 or more chronic conditions such as high blood pressure, diabetes, cardiovascular disease or musculoskeletal disability and take no less than 5 medications. Chronic conditions are difficult and expensive to treat while the gradual impairment of vision, hearing and brain function are directly related to ageing. This is not a good outlook!!! However, it is all not bad news….we need to see ourselves as an ‘aging athlete’. Let me explain. The degenerative effects of ageing are most definitely modifiable and the primary strategy to achieve this is with regular and consistent EXERCISE. An enormous amount of research has been done studying the positive effects of exercise on the ageing process.

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