Q&A with our triathlete physio Wendy Casterton

What made you become a physio?

It was always my dream job! My first undergraduate degree was in French, yet with life experience and a personal training and sports massage qualification, I was accepted on to a physiotherapy degree as a mature student. Nothing gives me greater pleasure than to see my clients smile again once they know they’re recovering from or in control of their physical ailment. As a physio, compared with other medical professionals, we have the privilege of spending a little more time with clients to really get to know them, which really helps with aligning treatment with their goals.

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Triathlon Injuries

Getting injured whilst participating in triathlon is incredibly common. Around 75% of all triathletes will suffer from injury during their racing career, rising to 91% for Ironman (long distance) triathletes. Overuse is the most common cause of injury – which is good news as that is something we can manage – usually occurring in the lower leg or ankle, knees, low back or shoulders. Occasionally injuries will be due to some kind of trauma, most likely falling off the bike!

Written by Wendy Casterton, Physiotherapist

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The Ageing Athlete

Ageing is unavoidable. It is happening to us all. From the year 2000 through to 2030, the number of adults over 85 years of age will increase by 204%! However, there is a simple way to slow down the effects of ageing……and it is to behave like an athlete.

Currently most people older than 75 years of age have 3 or more chronic conditions such as high blood pressure, diabetes, cardiovascular disease or musculoskeletal disability and take no less than 5 medications. Chronic conditions are difficult and expensive to treat while the gradual impairment of vision, hearing and brain function are directly related to ageing. This is not a good outlook!!! However, it is all not bad news….we need to see ourselves as an ‘aging athlete’. Let me explain. The degenerative effects of ageing are most definitely modifiable and the primary strategy to achieve this is with regular and consistent EXERCISE. An enormous amount of research has been done studying the positive effects of exercise on the ageing process.

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The Soleus – The Key to Your Running Success?

Up to 56% of regular recreational long distance (>3km) runners will sustain a running-related injury each year. Injuries to the lower leg in long-distance runners are common, with recent research showing that they account for up to 32.2% of all leg injuries. Due to the nature of the muscle, soleus injuries are commonly caused by muscle fatigue and over-training.

Many soleus muscle injuries can be misdiagnosed as gastrocnemius injuries and, as such, ineffectively treated. This can cause long-term disruption to training and performance. As the soleus only crosses the ankle joint, whereas the gastrocnemius crosses both the ankle and knee, it is less susceptible to strain injuries. However, these injuries are possible, and an effective training regime for this muscle can go a long way towards avoiding them.

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Are you an injured runner? Early Signs of Running Injury and Prevention

Are you an injured runner-intouchphysio

Runners are prone to injury, especially when they start running again after a long period of rest or suddenly increase the frequency, intensity or duration of their training. Sometimes running injuries can be traumatic and sudden, while others gradually occur and worsen over time. It is very tempting to ignore those minor pains and odd symptoms that you are feeling, but here are some warning signs that runners should not neglect.
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