Q&A with our triathlete physio Wendy Casterton

What made you become a physio?

It was always my dream job! My first undergraduate degree was in French, yet with life experience and a personal training and sports massage qualification, I was accepted on to a physiotherapy degree as a mature student. Nothing gives me greater pleasure than to see my clients smile again once they know they’re recovering from or in control of their physical ailment. As a physio, compared with other medical professionals, we have the privilege of spending a little more time with clients to really get to know them, which really helps with aligning treatment with their goals.

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Triathlon Injuries

Getting injured whilst participating in triathlon is incredibly common. Around 75% of all triathletes will suffer from injury during their racing career, rising to 91% for Ironman (long distance) triathletes. Overuse is the most common cause of injury – which is good news as that is something we can manage – usually occurring in the lower leg or ankle, knees, low back or shoulders. Occasionally injuries will be due to some kind of trauma, most likely falling off the bike!

Written by Wendy Casterton, Physiotherapist

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Getting back to the fitness routine you love after an injury

Often, we are motivated towards a fitness routine we enjoy, be it the daily ritual at the gym or yoga studio, the weekly scuttle around the tennis court, or even a guilt-driven run around the block.

Time and time again, we struggle with sustaining this consistency due to our enslavement to work, personal commitments, or a new/old injury.

It gets frustrating seeing how far we’ve progressed, only to regress on our fitness goals.

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Don’t let this common cause of knee pain slow you down – ITBS (IT Band Syndrome)

ITBS is one of the most commonly seen overuse injuries among our runner clients for their knee complaints. It is often the result of an overuse injury. In some athletes, repeated knee bending causes the ITB to produce friction over the rounded end of the thighbone or compression of the tissue underneath it. This results in persistent pain on the outer side of the knee which worsens with over-activity.

ALPHONSE TRANNE, Senior Physiotherapist, Prohealth In Touch Physiotherapy

 

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Test your hip strength for your chronic ankle sprain

Hip weakness is often neglected but is crucial to be identified especially for a chronically sprained ankle that is not improving. Hip weakness may have developed since the very acute stage of your injury when you walked in a compensatory movement pattern to avoid putting weight on your injured ankle. If the hip or gluteal muscles continue to stay weak at the later stage, it would put extra stress and continue to irritate your ankle.

 

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