Is it normal to have pain in yoga?

Is it Normal To Have Pain In Yoga?While some hold the belief of “No pain no gain”, when experiencing discomfort, it is important for yogis to be able to differentiate between the good and bad pain. Good pain includes the feeling of tightness while stretching and muscle soreness which usually presents 24 to 72 hours after practising yoga. Good pain is usually short-lived and will gradually disappear. On the other hand, bad pain includes sharp pain or a feeling of numbness. It may indicate an underlying injury, for instance, muscles strain, ligaments sprain or other structural damage. A bad pain signals you to stop putting yourself in danger. However, it does not means that you need to stop practising yoga at all. Read more

To CrossFit or not to CrossFit?

That is the question that regularly pops up during our Physiotherapy sessions from clients.

CrossFit (CF) is a workout methodology created by former gymnast Greg Glassman in 2001. It consists of a variety of exercises such as Olympic-like lifts, cardio training and multi-joint movements (like box jumps, pull-ups and jumping rope). This method of training and community has exploded worldwide over the last ten years and definitely in the last 5 in Singapore. This can be reflected by the amounts of CF ‘boxes’ which have propped up in Singapore and a number of people we encounter in the clinic who are now doing CF. Read more

Calf Strains

The soleus and gastrocnemius muscles make up the calf complex or ‘baby cow’ as it’s sometimes called. Calf strains are quite a common injury that we see in the clinic. These can occur during sprinting (such as running after a loose ball in soccer), during a strong push or drive movement (such as scrumming in Rugby), and also due to jumping and landing (such as in netball or basketball). Small grade 1 strains take 10-21 days to settle down, grade 2 injuries about 3-5 weeks and bigger grade 3 with muscle retraction (common) can take closer to 8 weeks to recover.

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Calf strengthening – 5 good reasons why ?

shutterstock_328172750Calf strengthening is not only a common denominator in alot of lower limb rehabilitation programs, but also plays an important role in lower limb biomechanics, as well as a key aspect of injury prevention.

Here are five good reasons why calf strengthening is important.

  1. The calf helps with shock absorption on landing, in both running and jumping sports.
  2. The calf plays a role in forward and vertical propulsion with running and jumping sports respectively, hence strengthening will assist with power and performance.
  3. Calf strengthening is an important component of injury rehabilitation for a number of injuries directly related to the calf such as achilles tendon issues, calf muscle tears, or ankle sprains.
  4. Calf strengthening plays a major role in lower limb biomechanics, and is a common exercise when doing rehabilitation for knee, hip and lower back injuries. Increasing strength in the calf can assist in offloading the injured area.
  5. Calf strengthening helps to prevent achilles tendon issues and calf muscle tears, where fatigue and lack of strength may be a contributing factor to injury.

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Pilates or Yoga – which one would be best for my injury recovery?

singapore-physio-pilatesAs physios it is common to get asked by clients what the difference is between pilates and yoga and would either be of benefit or detrimental to their injury and rehabilitation. With the popularity of both yoga and pilates in today’s society, people often want to know what the difference is?

Yoga involves a series of poses that create a stretch for your muscles and joints, and may either be sustained stretches or more flowing in nature between poses, creating more of a dynamic stretch. Read more

Are your calves tightening up from running ?

shutterstock_110888123Do you find your calves always stiffen/tighten with running? Let’s take a look at some potential reasons behind why the calf muscles get stressed.

1) Overload of the muscle due to inadequate muscle strength and power in the lower limbs.

Decreased lower limb strength can lead to the overload of the calf during the push-off phase of running. Our gluteal and quadriceps muscles play an important role in propelling ourselves forward. Without strength and endurance in these muscles, the calf muscle can become the sole driver of propulsion, hence can become fatigued and tired. Consideration also needs to be given to the calf itself in terms of strength and endurance, to handle the load placed upon it in running.

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