Beach running – with the good comes the bad

beach runningNot only does the beach offer a change in scenery, relaxation, and a potential source of motivation for training, it also offers a change in surface that is lower in impact and ground reaction forces. This change in surface can be beneficial for people with bony impact related injuries or for people who train frequently on a hard track and want to mix up their training load with a lighter impact session. Read more

Foam rolling the glutes

Foam roller is a useful tool to use as part of your recovery plan. It uses the principle of deep compression to help roll out adhesions or knots that develop over time. Rolling out these knots that are caused by over activity or under activity, will help to restore original muscle length, which assists in functionality.

Check out this exercise for foam rolling the glutes.

 

Ankle sprains can often lead to chronic knee pain

physio-ankle-treatmentAnkle sprains can often lead to chronic knee pain such as patellofemoral (kneecap) pain, jumper’s knee, runner’s knee.

Ankle sprains can alter ankle joint mechanics and cause reduced ankle movement (particularly dorsiflexion of the ankle). This reduction in ankle dorsiflexion causes increased valgus movement on the knee in functional tasks/ sports. Read more

Glute Bridge: Exercise for stronger butt muscles

Check out this glute bridging exercise, an effective way to strengthen your butt muscles.

Glutes play an important role in many running and impact sports for speed, power and stability. Strengthening your glutes is key for sport performance and also assists with injury prevention for many lower limb and lower back complaints.

 

Hydration in sport

physiotherapy - hydrationHydration in sport is vital to replace the loss of fluid that our body perspires, which controls our body temperature as we utilize energy. If we do not replace this fluid we overheat and dehydrate, which may lead to a decrease in performance and an increased risk of injury.

To minimize dehydration, athletes need to drink enough in exercise to match their sweat loss. Read more

Stress Fractures

physio-stress-injury A stress fracture is a tiny crack in a weight bearing bone. It can occur in any part of the body but predominantly occur in the lower leg or feet.

Stress fractures are related to overuse where the supporting muscles become fatigued and no longer absorb the continuing stress of the aggravating activity such as running. As a consequence the stress transfers over to the bone and tiny cracks can form.

Possible causes of stress fractures could be: sudden increases in training frequency, intensity or duration; poor conditioning; incorrect technique; change in training surface; poor foot wear; or anatomical variations such as flat feet, or bowed legs or knock knees that may cause an overload on certain bones. Read more