Let me tell you a story- Tales of Jim and Bob

Once upon a time, Jim and Bob both started tennis coaching. Both were intermediate tennis players in their late 30’s and had decided to shift the beer belly and get fit again. Every week, Jim and Bob would play several games of tennis and go for a few runs.

One day, they both started to get pain in their knee when running and playing tennis. The pain lasted several days. Because of that, Jim decided the best thing to do was to rest from all exercise for a couple of weeks, then go back to training at the same intensity. At first it felt ok, but after several sessions, his knee was giving him grief again.

Read more

How to be more active at work ? Try out some light exercises in the office

exercise in office

In previous article, we discussed the importance of being physically active. So how to be more active at work? Here are some suggestions by our physiotherapist:

1. Break down sitting time, take active break from the computer
2. Standing up when you are talking to your colleague or talking in phone
3. Alternate sitting and standing workstation
4. Try out the below light exercises in the office!

 

 

Read more

Are you active enough? How to define physcial activity?

An adult needs 150 minutes of moderate intensity physical activity per week

Physical inactivity or sedentary lifestyle is the main risk factor leading to various medical conditions such as type II diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, breast and colon cancer as well as musculoskeletal dysfunctions (neck and back pain). Benefits of physical activity include weight management, stress reduction, improved sleep and quality of life.

Physical activity is any bodily movement that requires energy expenditure. World Health Organization (WHO) recommends adult aged 18-64 should do at least 150 minutes (2.5 hours) of moderate intensity physical activity or at least 75 minutes of vigorous intensity physical activity per week.

Read more

Are you suffering from text neck syndrome?

We love technology, yet we need to stay alert for this repetitive stress injury

Every morning, as I step onto the morning bus and MRT for my commute to work, I am alarmed at what I see as a Physiotherapist: text neck! This is on top of poor work and home ergonomics as well as our increasingly sedentary lifestyle. This may all sound doom and gloom but fear not, we can help!

Text neck is unfortunately a new term that is used too often nowadays as a diagnosis for too many clients we see. Alarmingly, I see too many young children and teenagers with this in the clinic and outside of the clinic. Laptops and tablets further compound this epidemic. Check out the list below to see if you are also one of the text-neck victims. You can learn more about my exercise picks on how to relieve your “text neck” in the next article.

Read more

Q&A with Women’s Health Physio: Back pain early in pregnancy

Q: I’m pregnant and my back is starting to hurt. I’ve been told I need to just get on with this, as it’s just “pregnancy aches and pains”. Is there anything I can do?
Suzy: Yes, absolutely. While not uncommon, back pain early in pregnancy is not deemed normal and should be addressed. It often coincides with a muscular imbalance around the pelvis and can happen alongside other common areas of pain such as the hips, buttocks and pubic area. With the amount of change that happens in the body during pregnancy, it is hardly surprising that sometimes our muscles are slow to catch up! It is also important to note that women who experience back pain in pregnancy are up to 7 times more likely to experience some form of pelvic floor dysfunction, as the muscles can begin to function differently in response. Here at InTouch Physio, we can help you to address these issues, identify the structures which need work and try to reduce your symptoms so that you can enjoy your pregnancy

Read more

Are pelvic floor muscles functioning correctly? Over 25% of women suffered from Pelvic Floor Dysfunction (PSD)

Over 25% of all women are believed to suffer from pelvic floor dysfunction (PFD), and this number is generally considered to be an underestimation due to the sensitive nature of the symptoms; meaning that many cases go unreported.

The pelvic floor muscles are a crucial part of our musculoskeletal system, providing support for our internal organs, support for our unborn baby when pregnant, controlling continence and playing an important part in the sexual function.

Read more