Is it normal to have pain in yoga?

Is it Normal To Have Pain In Yoga?While some hold the belief of “No pain no gain”, when experiencing discomfort, it is important for yogis to be able to differentiate between the good and bad pain. Good pain includes the feeling of tightness while stretching and muscle soreness which usually presents 24 to 72 hours after practising yoga. Good pain is usually short-lived and will gradually disappear. On the other hand, bad pain includes sharp pain or a feeling of numbness. It may indicate an underlying injury, for instance, muscles strain, ligaments sprain or other structural damage. A bad pain signals you to stop putting yourself in danger. However, it does not means that you need to stop practising yoga at all. Read more

To CrossFit or not to CrossFit?

That is the question that regularly pops up during our Physiotherapy sessions from clients.

CrossFit (CF) is a workout methodology created by former gymnast Greg Glassman in 2001. It consists of a variety of exercises such as Olympic-like lifts, cardio training and multi-joint movements (like box jumps, pull-ups and jumping rope). This method of training and community has exploded worldwide over the last ten years and definitely in the last 5 in Singapore. This can be reflected by the amounts of CF ‘boxes’ which have propped up in Singapore and a number of people we encounter in the clinic who are now doing CF. Read more

Imaging for back pain – is it always necessary ?

stock-photo-acute-pain-in-a-male-lower-back-monochrome-image-isolated-on-a-white-background-341735282Low back pain is very common. Most of us will experience some form of back pain in our life time.

So is it always necessary to have an Xray, CT or MRI to work out the cause of the back pain?

Here are some of the downsides associated with back imaging that should be considered:

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Jumper’s knee (patellar tendinopathy)

stock-photo-beach-volleyball-players-in-sunglasses-under-sunlight-dynamic-sport-action-outdoor-525074893The patellar tendon is a strong thick tendon that sits below your kneecap at the front of the knee and is responsible for transferring load between the quadriceps muscle to the shin. These loads are passed through in activities such as stairs, running, jumping and landing. In some cases, loads that are placed through the patellar tendon can be excessive and increased too quickly and the tendon can begin to fail. Inflammatory and degenerate processes then commence and can lead to pain and disrepair.

Patellar tendinopathy (aka Jumper’s knee) commonly affects people involved in jumping sports such as basket ball and volleyball. it usually presents in scenarios where the load is increased too quickly or excessively. For example a sudden change in volume/load, or in frequency of training, or potentially after a rest/off season period and return to sport too quickly.

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TFCC treatment options

stock-photo-human-hand-with-a-wrist-brace-orthopedic-equipment-over-white-39150328In addition to last week’s post about TFCC injuries in the wrist.

What are the suggested treatment options for the management of TFCC injuries?

Management of TFCC injuries is mainly determined by whether the distal radioulnar joint is stable. If instability is present the joint needs to be stabilised.

Conservative options for TFCC injury are mainly considered in presence of a stable distal radioulnar joint include:

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