Let me tell you a story- Tales of Jim and Bob

Once upon a time, Jim and Bob both started tennis coaching. Both were intermediate tennis players in their late 30’s and had decided to shift the beer belly and get fit again. Every week, Jim and Bob would play several games of tennis and go for a few runs.

One day, they both started to get pain in their knee when running and playing tennis. The pain lasted several days. Because of that, Jim decided the best thing to do was to rest from all exercise for a couple of weeks, then go back to training at the same intensity. At first it felt ok, but after several sessions, his knee was giving him grief again.

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How to be more active at work ? Try out some light exercises in the office

exercise in office

In previous article, we discussed the importance of being physically active. So how to be more active at work? Here are some suggestions by our physiotherapist:

1. Break down sitting time, take active break from the computer
2. Standing up when you are talking to your colleague or talking in phone
3. Alternate sitting and standing workstation
4. Try out the below light exercises in the office!

 

 

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Are you active enough? How to define physcial activity?

An adult needs 150 minutes of moderate intensity physical activity per week

Physical inactivity or sedentary lifestyle is the main risk factor leading to various medical conditions such as type II diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, breast and colon cancer as well as musculoskeletal dysfunctions (neck and back pain). Benefits of physical activity include weight management, stress reduction, improved sleep and quality of life.

Physical activity is any bodily movement that requires energy expenditure. World Health Organization (WHO) recommends adult aged 18-64 should do at least 150 minutes (2.5 hours) of moderate intensity physical activity or at least 75 minutes of vigorous intensity physical activity per week.

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Are you an injured runner? Early Signs of Running Injury and Prevention

Are you an injured runner-intouchphysio

Runners are prone to injury, especially when they start running again after a long period of rest or suddenly increase the frequency, intensity or duration of their training. Sometimes running injuries can be traumatic and sudden, while others gradually occur and worsen over time. It is very tempting to ignore those minor pains and odd symptoms that you are feeling, but here are some warning signs that runners should not neglect.
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Paul’s Tips: 2 Strength exercises all runners should be doing

Split squat by Paul intouchphysio
Split squat by Paul 

1. Split Squat
If done correctly, you should feel this fatigue the front of the thigh and the buttock muscles on the front leg.

1. Stand with one leg forward and the other behind you in a split leg stance
2. Preferably put the back foot on a small step or bench
3. Keeping the knee in line with your second toe and the torso straight
4. Bend the front leg until the knee is flexed to 90 degrees
5. Return to the start position and repeat

For progression, hold on to a weight in the opposite hand to the leg that is being worked.

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The No.1 injury prevention strategy – Modulate your STRESS (Part 2)

Physiological stress: Friend or Foe?
When we fail to respond suitably to an emotional or physical ‘threat’, whether it be real or perceived, our body initiates a ‘Fight or Flight’ response and our adrenal glands release a substance called cortisol. This is known as the ‘stress hormone’. During this response, our body sends stored energy to our working muscles and also suppresses the functions of growth, repair, digestion, sexual drive and the immune system, so as to conserve valuable energy. If the ‘Fight or Flight’ response is turned on too often or we remain continually in a state of ‘Fight or Flight’, very typical in modern life, this can cause immense wear and tear on the cells of our body.

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